Alcoholics Anonymous AA support-groups

The Founding Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Recovering alcoholics have benefitted from the support provided by Alcoholics Anonymous for many years. Alcoholics Anonymous provides moral support to people that are trying to stop alcoholism and it started its operation in 1935. The journey to recovery is aided by the 12 stages that guide the operations of AA. Many former alcoholics believe the group was instrumental in helping them remain sober and the group still uses the original 12 steps in its meetings.


Presently, Alcoholics Anonymous can boast of more than 2 million active members throughout the world and more than 50,000 groups nationwide.


What To Expect From Attending An AA Meeting

It is always quite challenging the first time you go for the meeting if you are not aware of what goes on there. It means stepping out of your comfort zone, visiting a room full of people you don't know who have a similar problem and just like you need help to get better. It is fortunate that every AA attendee understands your feelings exactly. AA was founded by recovering alcohol addicts and its model has remained till today. Everybody in the AA programs even those running them has gone through the program at some point, so they empathize with members.


New members are made to feel comfortable Although there is no requirement to contribute, this is always encouraged. This is because it takes time for one to build trust so they can open up to strangers. After some time, they start feeling at home and find tremendous relief and healing through openly sharing their experiences.


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Difference Between Closed And Open Meetings

Only the people that are struggling with alcohol addiction are the ones allowed to attend the closed meetings in AA.

On the other hand, friends, spouses and family members are welcome to attend open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. A certain share of the people attending these meetings prefer to keep their therapy separated from the rest of their lives. However, some people recover faster when their families and friends are near them.


The 12 Steps Of AA

Alcoholics Anonymous is the first group that came up with the 12 stages of achieving addiction recovery which is currently being used by other communities. Despite the steps being presented in linear fashion participants are known to view them as an ongoing circle. The member needs to be comfortable with every step before they can move to the next stage.

One starts with acknowledging they are having a problem and they cannot solve it on their own. Further steps include the following making a firm decision to quit; admitting all your wrongs to yourself and others; making amends for all wrongdoings; and commitment to permanent improvement. More on the 12 steps can be found here


Reasons For Not Going To AA Meetings

Most people are not comfortable with attending a meeting with AA and therefore, come up with reasons not to attend. Some of their common objections are the following

  • They are not convinced it will work for them
  • They do not want to risk meeting someone they know
  • They aren't sure they really have a problem

Rather than concentrate on the excuses despite having a feeling that they are enormous people who are nervous about attending a meeting should focus on the reasons why they are considering this organisation in the first place.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. Attending a meeting may end up saving you a lifetime of pain and destruction brought about by the addiction to alcohol.


Finding An Alcoholics Anonymous Group Near You

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. Choose the kind of a meeting you want to attend - a closed or open one - and in what area, and you will be able to find a group online using our meeting finder. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 772 3971.